Dementia UK

Alzheimer's Matters Theatre

The main theatre will host talks on a wide range of key topics for carers, relatives and professionals as well as chaired ‘Question Time’ sessions.

Speakers include: George McNamara, Alzheimer’s Society; Dr Rosa Sancho, ARUK; Andrea Sutcliffe, CQC and Hilda Hayo, Dementia UK. Also Joy Watson will be giving an inspirational talk on living with dementia.

View the 2017 programme below

TIMETITLESPEAKER
10.30 - 10.40A welcome and introduction to this year's Alzheimer's ShowBernadine McCrory, Operations Director, Alzheimer's Society
10.40 - 11.10Delivering Integrated Care for people with dementia. What are the benefits of integrated care for people with dementia? Including examples of innovative practice in integrated dementia care.Hazel Bayley, Regional Operations Manager, Alzheimer's Society
11.15 - 11.55The latest research and innovative approaches aiming to tackle dementia. Dementia is our greatest medical challenge. Scientists across the world are working to find different ways to diagnose, prevent and treat dementia. Dr Sancho will give a background to the diseases that lead to this complex condition and provide an update on recent progress in research.Dr Rosa Sancho, Head of Research, Alzheimer’s Research UK
12.00 - 12.30Quality Matters – how do we make high quality care a reality? Andrea Sutcliffe, Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care, Care Quality Commission
12.40 - 13.30QUESTION TIME. Put your questions to a panel of experts on topics relating to dementia and care.
Dr Rosa Sancho, Head of Research, Alzheimer’s Research UK.
Andrea Sutcliffe, Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care, Care Quality Commission.
Prof Peter Mittler.
Hazel Bayley, Regional Operations Manager, Alzheimer's Society
Chair: Bernadine McCrory, Operations Director, Alzheimer's Society
14.00 – 14.25People with dementia receive the worst care in the developed world (OECD 2015): A Human Rights Issue. This year the UK government is being held to account for implementing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. I will give some examples of how the rights of people with dementia are being ignored. You can do the same.Professor Peter Mittler, CBE, Hon. Research Fellow and Emeritus Professor of Special Needs Education, University of Manchester. Human Rights Adviser, Alzheimer’s Disease International and Dementia Alliance International
14.30 - 14.55Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness by enabling and empowering people with dementia. How Dementia Friendly Communities and pioneering volunteering programme, Side by Side, are helping to reduce loneliness and isolation for people affected by dementia.Lisa Beck, Side by Side Programme Lead, Alzheimer's Society
15.00 - 15.25Getting a diagnosis. Early recognition and accurate diagnosis of dementia combined with appropriate post diagnostic support and interventions, can reduce the distress experienced by the whole family. If a person has a timely diagnosis of dementia it can enable them to actively engage in making plans and decisions about their finances, work, welfare and legal matters. Hilda Hayo, Chief Admiral Nurse/CEO, Dementia UK
15.30 - 16.15Dying well with dementia - panel discussion. All people who develop dementia will have dementia at the end of their lives, either as the condition they die from or as a factor which may complicate the care of a different condition. This session explores the key aspects that can constitute towards dying well with dementia.Chair: Sue Clarke, Operations Manager, Alzheimer's Society
Speakers:
Jacqueline Crowther PhD, Admiral Nurse
Andrea Rees, Clinical Nurse Manager, Marie Curie
TIMETITLESPEAKER
10.40 - 10.50A welcome and introduction to this year's Alzheimer's ShowHazel Blears, Alzheimer's Society Trustee
10.50 - 11.15Converting skin cells to brain cells in dementia research. Alzheimer’s Society Research fellow David Hicks explains how using cutting-edge techniques that transform skin cells into brain cells in the lab is helping researchers to understand what happens in the brain in dementiaDavid Hicks, Alzheimer's Society Research fellow
11.15 - 11.55Discovering new ways to tackle dementia. Our bodies use inflammation as a defence system to protect us from damage, but if these systems go wrong, could this contribute to diseases like Alzheimer’s? Dr Brough talks about his work looking at whether drugs that dampen down inflammation could be used to treat Alzheimer’s disease.Dr David Brough, dementia researcher and senior lecturer at the University of Manchester, funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK
12.00 - 12.25Dementia - A personal viewJoy Watson was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in her mid-50s.
12.30 - 13.20QUESTION TIME. Put your questions to a panel of experts on topics relating to dementia and care.
Hilda Hayo, Chief Admiral Nurse/CEO, Dementia UK.
Dr David Brough, dementia researcher and senior lecturer at the University of Manchester, funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK.
Joy Watson.
Dr Emer MacSweeney, CEO Re:Cognition Health & Consultant Neuroradiologist
Chair: Hazel Blears, Alzheimer's Society Trustee
14.00 - 14.30Alzheimer’s without Dementia. Explaining Dementia vs AD. Making an early diagnosis of AD, before dementia occurs. What happens in the brain in AD? How new medications available, internationally, in final phase clinical trials can slow progression of AD or improve symptoms of memory loss.Dr Emer MacSweeney, CEO Re:Cognition Health & Consultant Neuroradiologist
14.30 - 14.55Family involvement in acute care- what can you do? This talk will discuss why family involvement and effective communication is so important when a person is admitted to hospital and how this impacts on the family and patient experience. The benefits will be identified as reduced anxiety and stress for the person with the diagnosis of dementia and their family. In addition, there is a potential for reduced length of stay in a hospital ward.Angela Moore, Admiral Nurse Clinical Specialist Dementia Lead, Dementia UK
15.00 - 15.25A practical guide to living with memory problems. This workshop will focus on practical strategies for living well with dementia or memory problems. Many of the ideas are suggestions from people with dementia or memory problems, family carers and research. Sue Clarke, Alzheimer's Society and Dr Ann Johnson, Alzheimer's Society Ambassador